Questions You Need to Ask About Diabetes

Diabetes is a lifelong disease, but not a life sentence. People diagnosed with this illness needs to stay healthy and take control of their ailment. The global prevalence of this sickness was estimated to 9% among adults aged 18 and above. If you have a loved one or someone dear to you who is battling this illness, the best that you can do is to invest your time in learning more knowledge about this disease. Aside from buying their medicine for diabetes, be more compassionate and ask questions or research more about this rampant disease. According to research, diabetes will be the 3rd most prevalent illness in 2030! It would be a good idea to be more informed about this condition as early as possible.

Here are some of the following questions you should be asking, and the answers to them.

What Causes Diabetes?

Diabetes is a chronic disease that occurs either when the pancreas does not produce enough insulin or when the body can’t effectively use the insulin it produces. Insulin is very important because it is a hormone that regulates blood sugar. Health care providers however have not traced what really causes diabetes, although they have stated that a lot of factors may affect the chances of a person acquiring this disease. It includes family history of diabetes, ethnic background, overweight or obesity, age, medication complications and pregnancy. Ah yes, surprisingly enough, even pregnancy could be factor! Since bearing a child would put extra stress on woman’s body, some women are prone to developing diabetes.

What Are the Types of Diabetes?

There are two main types of diabetes, type 1 and 2:

TYPE 1

Previously known as insulin-dependent or childhood onset, type 1 diabetes requires daily administration of insulin. There is no known cause for type 1 diabetes and it is not preventable with current knowledge. Symptoms include excessive excretion of urine, thirst and constant hunger also vision changes, fatigue and weight loss. Symptoms like these will just occur suddenly. Most of the people who are diagnosed with type 1 diabetes are under 30 years old.

TYPE 2

90% of people in the world are more prone to type 2 diabetes than type 1. They are formerly called non-insulin-dependent or adult onset because of the body’s ineffective use of insulin. Type 2 diabetes is more acquirable for people who aren’t physically active and are overweight. Until recently, studies have shown that this diabetes are common among adults. However, it has been found that it also occurs in children.

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes occurs in pregnant women who have never been diagnosed with diabetes before, but have high blood glucose levels. Women with this type of diabetes are at an increased risk of complications during pregnancy and at delivery, and they are at risk of type 2 diabetes in the future.

How can you lower the risk of Diabetes for you and your family?

Prevention is the number one solution. A healthy living will really make a big impact in your lifestyle. Everyone is advised to maintain a healthy body weight and to be physically active with at least 30 minutes of regular or moderate to intense exercise.

Remember that you are the one in charge of your life. Take control of it and live healthily to avoid such diseases. A healthy lifestyle and making good choices will significantly increase your chances of having a life free of disease!

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Diabetes is a lifelong disease, but not a life sentence. People diagnosed with this illness needs to stay healthy and take control of their ailment. The global prevalence of this sickness was estimated to 9% among adults aged 18 and above. If you have a loved one or someone dear to you who is battling this illness, the best that you can do is to invest your time in learning more knowledge about this disease. Aside from buying their medicine for diabetes, be more compassionate and ask questions or research more about this rampant disease. According to research, diabetes will be the 3rd most prevalent illness in 2030! It would be a good idea to be more informed about this condition as early as possible.

Here are some of the following questions you should be asking, and the answers to them.

What Causes Diabetes?

Diabetes is a chronic disease that occurs either when the pancreas does not produce enough insulin or when the body can’t effectively use the insulin it produces. Insulin is very important because it is a hormone that regulates blood sugar. Health care providers however have not traced what really causes diabetes, although they have stated that a lot of factors may affect the chances of a person acquiring this disease. It includes family history of diabetes, ethnic background, overweight or obesity, age, medication complications and pregnancy. Ah yes, surprisingly enough, even pregnancy could be factor! Since bearing a child would put extra stress on woman’s body, some women are prone to developing diabetes.

What Are the Types of Diabetes?

There are two main types of diabetes, type 1 and 2:

TYPE 1

Previously known as insulin-dependent or childhood onset, type 1 diabetes requires daily administration of insulin. There is no known cause for type 1 diabetes and it is not preventable with current knowledge. Symptoms include excessive excretion of urine, thirst and constant hunger also vision changes, fatigue and weight loss. Symptoms like these will just occur suddenly. Most of the people who are diagnosed with type 1 diabetes are under 30 years old.

TYPE 2

90% of people in the world are more prone to type 2 diabetes than type 1. They are formerly called non-insulin-dependent or adult onset because of the body’s ineffective use of insulin. Type 2 diabetes is more acquirable for people who aren’t physically active and are overweight. Until recently, studies have shown that this diabetes are common among adults. However, it has been found that it also occurs in children.

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes occurs in pregnant women who have never been diagnosed with diabetes before, but have high blood glucose levels. Women with this type of diabetes are at an increased risk of complications during pregnancy and at delivery, and they are at risk of type 2 diabetes in the future.

How can you lower the risk of Diabetes for you and your family?

Prevention is the number one solution. A healthy living will really make a big impact in your lifestyle. Everyone is advised to maintain a healthy body weight and to be physically active with at least 30 minutes of regular or moderate to intense exercise.

Remember that you are the one in charge of your life. Take control of it and live healthily to avoid such diseases. A healthy lifestyle and making good choices will significantly increase your chances of having a life free of disease!

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