Diabetes
7 Ways To Help Yourself Get Through A Shocking Diagnosis

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7 Ways To Help Yourself Get Through A Shocking Diagnosis

Posted on January 30, 2014 | Author and Reviewed by: Dan Lois B. Villanueva. RPh

“It’s _________ (cancer, dengue, HIV/AIDS, diabetes, etc.). I’m so sorry.”

The diagnosis of a major disease truly shakes a person to their very core. As Guiliana Rancic (nee DePandi) said in an E! interview, “When I was diagnosed with [breast] cancer, I was shell-shocked.” It changed her picture-perfect life completely. She suddenly had to go through the dramatic ups-and-downs of this episode in her life, which later led to a double mastectomy.

But she shared in later interviews with the online editions of CNN and Health.com that it was through the love and support of her husband, friends, boss, and sheer willpower that she got through the ordeal. She now lives a happy life with her husband Bill and their baby boy Edward Duke.

We may not all be Guiliana Rancics, but our life certainly doesn’t stop once we’re diagnosed with a devastating disease. There are many ways to get through a health trial, and in this article, we’ll look at several tips on how to do just that – whether it’s the big “C” or diabetes.

Surround yourself with people you love.

positive peopleWhen diagnosed with a major disease, an online article by Health Link British Columbia stresses the importance of this. You need to connect with people who can be your rock/anchor, encouragement, or support, and most importantly, make you feel loved.

If you’ve got diabetes, don’t just sulk and feel sorry for yourself – more than your medicine for diabetes, the real medicine that will help you fight your disease is the love and support of people you care about.

Relax. Breathe. Don’t make rash decisions.

Dr. Jessie Gruman – author of the book “AfterShock: What to Do When the Doctor Gives You – Or Someone You Love – A Devastating Diagnosis” – advises, “Do not make major decisions once you’ve gotten the news. Take a time out. Do some research and get a second opinion. These make all the difference in getting the best doctor and treatment.”

Focus on getting treated.

Elizabeth Heubeck, a Web MD feature writer informs, “Stick to getting treatments and your doctor’s appointments. If you need to let go of unnecessary things at the moment, do so.”

Don’t let your emotions get the best of you.

You may experience a flurry of emotions when you are diagnosed. Anger, confusion, and sadness may be among the few, but Dr. Gruman counsels, “The intensity will subside in the next coming days.”

Join a support group.

It’s also a good idea to become part of a support group pertaining to a particular illness – like cancer – because you will find people No one fights alonewho share the same challenges or those who have already gone through them.

These people are in the best position to help you go through your trying time. According to a Web MD article, you will discover new ways of coping through the advice of your peers. Be sure that everything is kept confidential within the group.

Aside from being supported, be sure to open to them about your problems. According to a Health Guide online resource, bottling up your emotions increases your stress even more, and could lead to many more health problems such as heart disease, digestive problems, sleep problems, weight problems, and autoimmune diseases.

Make some adjustments for your health

It’s time to modify your lifestyle. Taking good care of yourself is a start. Getting rest, exercise, and eating a balanced diet are just some of the few things one can start with, according to an NHS article.

Think positive

You won’t always be sick.

Remember:

• You have the support of friends and family.

• You’re getting treatment.

• You’re on the road to recovery.

To end, remember this quote from Guy de Maupassant, “A sick thought can devour the body’s flesh more than fever or consumption.” Keep a healthy thought life, it will fuel your hope and help you get through your shocking diagnosis.