Pounding Pain! 5 Types of Headaches

pounding headache

Headaches are unfortunately a part of life. We often drink medicine for headache and fever to ease away the pain, but knowing which one to take will be easier if you know what particular type of headache you have. Check out our list of headaches to see if you have one of these.

 

Migraine

Sometimes you may notice that you have a headache that lasts for so long, it feels like you’re only a few pounds away from going nuts! This is no longer an ordinary headache but a migraine. Migraines are moderate to severe headaches that are on one side only and can ache for several hours to even three days. It may be accompanied by nausea, vomiting, light sensitivity and sound sensitivity. Most sufferers noticed pain at the back of the head or neck before or while the pain is ongoing. The pain then stays put on just one side of the head. It can cause a disruption to one’s routine. It can be treated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs like aspirin or your doctor can prescribe preventive medication if attacks occur more than four paralyzing attacks.

Icepick Headache

Do you know what an ice pick is? It is a pointed tool used to break and chip blocks of ice. To do this, one must do a stabbing motion. Imagine that that is what is happening to your head. Ouch, right? That is what happens when you have an ice pick headache or as it is properly called in medicine, Primary Stabbing Headache. It is a painful headache where you can feel as if your temples, eye or parietal area is being stabbed once or multiple times. The pain can be so intense that it causes tears and stuffy nose. These headaches do not last long as the attacks may only last for just few seconds but it may happen anytime during the day. There is no determined time period between attacks. These headaches may be an independent symptom but more often than not, they are connected to another cranial problem such as migraines, stroke or head trauma, which may in turn be the cause of the headache.

 

headache pain

 

Tension Headache

Imagine a band is wrapped around your head. Got it? Now imagine this band being tightened. Stop. Now imagine your head with that pain. This is what you call a tension headache. These headaches occur in the temples and front of your head. The pain is bearable for most people and will not hinder their work. Some of the theorized causes of tension headaches are stress, awkward sleeping positions, and muscular tightness over your scalp and at the back of your neck. To treat this, take a painkiller or for a total lifestyle change, cut down on the caffeine and hydrate more.

Menstrual Migraines

Women worldwide undergo a monthly bodily function that is not only painful but irritating as well: Menstruation. Women will have several symptoms ranging from muscle cramps to uterus pain but the one obvious symptom that some women do not contribute to this process is menstrual migraines. This may occur two days before their cycle and during the first three. These headaches last longer than the usual headaches and women may only see the link between their period and headaches when they are well into their thirties. The cause of this migraine is a drop in estrogen levels, according to studies. These headaches also occur more often in women who take birth control pills. To treat it, start taking Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications two days before the start of the cycle, ending only when the cycle is over.

Dehydration Headaches

There are times when you are so busy you actually forget to drink water. Then you develop a headache in one side of your head. Moving your head or just walking around worsens the pain. The solution is very simple: drink water or something with electrolytes, such as a sports drink. Do not drink too much or too fast as this may cause water poisoning.

 

If the pain is too intense or has been consistent for a few days, go see a doctor. Headaches are not a pleasant thing and may be symptom of something worse, such as (not to scare you) a tumor. Do not hesitate and book an appointment now.