8 Factors That Affect Your Cholesterol Level

According to an online article from WebMD, an excess of cholesterol in your system is a major contribution to heart disease. The surplus of LDL clogs your arteries, causing what is called atherosclerosis. This condition impedes blood flow to the heart. When that happens, one may be susceptible to chest pains. If full artery blockage occurs, a heart attack is not too far behind.

When atherosclerosis happens, the heart has to work double time to pump blood. Think of a clogged pump. When water cannot go through because of a blockage, the water gets stuck in the pipe. This unusual effort in the heart’s arteries is called hypertension, or what is more commonly known as high blood pressure.

One’s body cholesterol levels are something that should be watched out for. Having the right amount of HDL is good, but having a surplus of LDL isn’t, as LDL is considered bad cholesterol. This kind of cholesterol leads to health risks such as heart problems and weight gain.

People who have diabetes are at high risk of also increasing their cholesterol level, according to an article by the American Heart Association. This is probably due to the fact that diabetes-stricken patients have to eat more food so their body has more energy. The additional intake of food then results in an increase of cholesterol levels, which is also why people with diabetes are prone to heart disease.

For your knowledge, here are 5 factors to consider that affect cholesterol levels. We encourage you to stay tuned to this article so that you don’t have to resort to medicine for diabetes or medicine for high cholesterol when it’s too late.

 

1. Fatty foods

Foods rich in saturated fat and are naturally high in cholesterol can cause disbalance in one’s cholesterol levels. According to an article from the website How Stuff Works, foods high in saturated fat include hydrogenated vegetable oils like palm and coconut oil and avocado, among others.

Foods high in cholesterol include deep-fried edibles, red meat, and shrimp.

If these two food groups come together, they pose a threat to one’s health. For alternatives to these generally unhealthy cuisine, check our previous post, 7 Alternatives To High Cholesterol Foods.

2. Genetics

Genetic make up also dictates the cholesterol level a person has. A particular type of genetic cholesterol is called familial hypercholesterolemia. If your family has a history of high cholesterol, it is best for you to get checked to see if you also inherited this from them.

3. Weight

According to research done by physicians at the Oklahoma Heart Hospital, being overweight or fat leads to greater LDL levels. As with #2, your body type is also determined by genetics. Look at the size of existing relatives and/or check your family background in order for you to properly address your cholesterol levels according to your size.

4. Exercise

Getting a good sweat regularly maintains cholesterol levels, as exercise lowers LDL and increases HDL. According to an online article by Family Virtue, 30 minutes of exercise daily is one of the easiest ways to lower bad cholesterol and lose weight.

5. Age

Research shows that cholesterol levels rise as we get older. This goes on until about 60-65 years of age. For those getting along in their years, this should be a sign to consult a doctor and consider engaging in exercise regularly.

A majority of people would probably agree that they desire a longer life if asked. In order to do that, maintaining cholesterol levels is key. All these factors are tied together. As one ages, regular exercise and healthy eating counter unhealthy cholesterol levels induced by weight gain and genetics. These should be considered in order to promote health and wellness well into one’s golden years.

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According to an online article from WebMD, an excess of cholesterol in your system is a major contribution to heart disease. The surplus of LDL clogs your arteries, causing what is called atherosclerosis. This condition impedes blood flow to the heart. When that happens, one may be susceptible to chest pains. If full artery blockage occurs, a heart attack is not too far behind.

When atherosclerosis happens, the heart has to work double time to pump blood. Think of a clogged pump. When water cannot go through because of a blockage, the water gets stuck in the pipe. This unusual effort in the heart’s arteries is called hypertension, or what is more commonly known as high blood pressure.

One’s body cholesterol levels are something that should be watched out for. Having the right amount of HDL is good, but having a surplus of LDL isn’t, as LDL is considered bad cholesterol. This kind of cholesterol leads to health risks such as heart problems and weight gain.

People who have diabetes are at high risk of also increasing their cholesterol level, according to an article by the American Heart Association. This is probably due to the fact that diabetes-stricken patients have to eat more food so their body has more energy. The additional intake of food then results in an increase of cholesterol levels, which is also why people with diabetes are prone to heart disease.

For your knowledge, here are 5 factors to consider that affect cholesterol levels. We encourage you to stay tuned to this article so that you don’t have to resort to medicine for diabetes or medicine for high cholesterol when it’s too late.

 

1. Fatty foods

Foods rich in saturated fat and are naturally high in cholesterol can cause disbalance in one’s cholesterol levels. According to an article from the website How Stuff Works, foods high in saturated fat include hydrogenated vegetable oils like palm and coconut oil and avocado, among others.

Foods high in cholesterol include deep-fried edibles, red meat, and shrimp.

If these two food groups come together, they pose a threat to one’s health. For alternatives to these generally unhealthy cuisine, check our previous post, 7 Alternatives To High Cholesterol Foods.

2. Genetics

Genetic make up also dictates the cholesterol level a person has. A particular type of genetic cholesterol is called familial hypercholesterolemia. If your family has a history of high cholesterol, it is best for you to get checked to see if you also inherited this from them.

3. Weight

According to research done by physicians at the Oklahoma Heart Hospital, being overweight or fat leads to greater LDL levels. As with #2, your body type is also determined by genetics. Look at the size of existing relatives and/or check your family background in order for you to properly address your cholesterol levels according to your size.

4. Exercise

Getting a good sweat regularly maintains cholesterol levels, as exercise lowers LDL and increases HDL. According to an online article by Family Virtue, 30 minutes of exercise daily is one of the easiest ways to lower bad cholesterol and lose weight.

5. Age

Research shows that cholesterol levels rise as we get older. This goes on until about 60-65 years of age. For those getting along in their years, this should be a sign to consult a doctor and consider engaging in exercise regularly.

A majority of people would probably agree that they desire a longer life if asked. In order to do that, maintaining cholesterol levels is key. All these factors are tied together. As one ages, regular exercise and healthy eating counter unhealthy cholesterol levels induced by weight gain and genetics. These should be considered in order to promote health and wellness well into one’s golden years.

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