Why Your Weight Matters? The Science Behind Diabetes and Obesity

Obesity and Diabetes


about 80-90% of people diagnosed with type II diabetes are likely to be diagnosed as obese.

We all know that diabetes and obesity are two different diseases. But even though there is a clear distinction between the two, there are countless studies that relate them to one another. What exactly is the link between diabetes and obesity? Can obesity really cause diabetes? In this article, we’ll discuss the science behind the two diseases, and why your weight should matter to you.

Being overweight makes the body more resistant to insulin and thus increases the body’s risk of developing diabetes.

First off, let’s start with the numbers. According to a study conducted by the International Diabetes Foundation, about 80-90% of people diagnosed with type II diabetes are likely to be diagnosed as obese. That’s pretty staggering proof that the two diseases are indeed correlated. Health experts believe that the heavier a person is, the more difficult it is for that person to maintain the right blood glucose levels. Being overweight makes the body more resistant to insulin and thus increases the body’s risk of developing diabetes. This is a startling connection, especially if you’ve been battling obesity for some time now. Before you know it, you’ll need to take medicine for diabetes to counteract the effects.

absorbed glucose, when not used as fuel, gets stored as fat.

Is it the insulin that causes weight gain? In a way yes. When your blood glucose becomes unstable, insulin becomes a necessity in making sure that your body still functions properly. The added insulin though forces the cells to absorb the extra glucose instead of eliminating it. The absorbed glucose, when not used as fuel, gets stored as fat. But that’s just one way that insulin causes weight gain.

diabetics fail to make the necessary lifestyle changes that is required.

Another reason why insulin dependent diabetics gain weight is that many newly diagnosed diabetics fail to make the necessary lifestyle changes that iscouch potato - obesity required. You see, once you start taking insulin, you’ll need to modify your diet accordingly since there’s really no need to eat so much food anymore. But with the supersize culture that we live, watching what you eat, and how much can be a challenge. A lot of diabetics fail to take the extra step, resulting to more weight gain complications.

Is there still hope?

The good news is, the medical community is working nonstop to develop medication that will combat the ugly effects of insulin resistance. Rennin blocking drugs for example have shown great promise when it comes to treating diabetes and obesity. These types of drugs will not only control blood pressure, but it will also reduce the risk of type II diabetes.

In the meantime however, you can reduce your chances of developing diabetes by maintaining a healthy diet and increasing your physical activity. If you’re already diagnosed to be diabetic, there are medications that can help you keep your insulin levels stable. Try losing the extra pounds as studies have shown that even a small weight loss of about 5-10% can reduce your risk of developing health complications that stem from diabetes and obesity.

Do you believe that obesity can really lead to diabetes? If you have any personal experience that you would like to share, let us know in the comments section below.

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Obesity and Diabetes


about 80-90% of people diagnosed with type II diabetes are likely to be diagnosed as obese.

We all know that diabetes and obesity are two different diseases. But even though there is a clear distinction between the two, there are countless studies that relate them to one another. What exactly is the link between diabetes and obesity? Can obesity really cause diabetes? In this article, we’ll discuss the science behind the two diseases, and why your weight should matter to you.

Being overweight makes the body more resistant to insulin and thus increases the body’s risk of developing diabetes.

First off, let’s start with the numbers. According to a study conducted by the International Diabetes Foundation, about 80-90% of people diagnosed with type II diabetes are likely to be diagnosed as obese. That’s pretty staggering proof that the two diseases are indeed correlated. Health experts believe that the heavier a person is, the more difficult it is for that person to maintain the right blood glucose levels. Being overweight makes the body more resistant to insulin and thus increases the body’s risk of developing diabetes. This is a startling connection, especially if you’ve been battling obesity for some time now. Before you know it, you’ll need to take medicine for diabetes to counteract the effects.

absorbed glucose, when not used as fuel, gets stored as fat.

Is it the insulin that causes weight gain? In a way yes. When your blood glucose becomes unstable, insulin becomes a necessity in making sure that your body still functions properly. The added insulin though forces the cells to absorb the extra glucose instead of eliminating it. The absorbed glucose, when not used as fuel, gets stored as fat. But that’s just one way that insulin causes weight gain.

diabetics fail to make the necessary lifestyle changes that is required.

Another reason why insulin dependent diabetics gain weight is that many newly diagnosed diabetics fail to make the necessary lifestyle changes that iscouch potato - obesity required. You see, once you start taking insulin, you’ll need to modify your diet accordingly since there’s really no need to eat so much food anymore. But with the supersize culture that we live, watching what you eat, and how much can be a challenge. A lot of diabetics fail to take the extra step, resulting to more weight gain complications.

Is there still hope?

The good news is, the medical community is working nonstop to develop medication that will combat the ugly effects of insulin resistance. Rennin blocking drugs for example have shown great promise when it comes to treating diabetes and obesity. These types of drugs will not only control blood pressure, but it will also reduce the risk of type II diabetes.

In the meantime however, you can reduce your chances of developing diabetes by maintaining a healthy diet and increasing your physical activity. If you’re already diagnosed to be diabetic, there are medications that can help you keep your insulin levels stable. Try losing the extra pounds as studies have shown that even a small weight loss of about 5-10% can reduce your risk of developing health complications that stem from diabetes and obesity.

Do you believe that obesity can really lead to diabetes? If you have any personal experience that you would like to share, let us know in the comments section below.

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